Today is Labor Day in the United States, a day “dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers.”

Ramiro Gomez. No Splash (after David Hockney’s A Bigger Splash, 1967), 2013. Acrylic on canvas 96 x 96 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Charlie James Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Osceola Refetoff.

Ramiro Gomez. No Splash (after David Hockney’s A Bigger Splash, 1967), 2013. Acrylic on canvas; 96 x 96 in. Courtesy of the artist and Charlie James Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Osceola Refetoff.

In honor of the day, we present you with links for further reading:

More than a dozen articles on labor, artistic services, precarity, working for free, and related subjects are included in Art Practical’s Issue 5.4: Valuing Labor in the Arts

Labor Arts ”presents powerful images to further understanding of the past and present lives of working people”

Who are the laborers building your museum, and how are they treated? The artist-activists in the Gulf Labor coalition shine a light on the “coercive recruitment, and deplorable living and working conditions” of the migrant workers constructing the Guggenheim, Louvre, and the Sheikh Zayed National Museum in Abu Dhabi

Bone up on facts about working artists at the Bureau of Labor Statistics

Of course, we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention W.A.G.E. Have you read their wo/manifesto?